Connect with us

We need your input to help set priorities and update the Transformation 2025 Plan to positively impact African-Americans, North Omaha and the Greater Omaha area.

Please take 10-15 minutes to complete this survey: https://bit.ly/3qRAePa

 

Transformation 2025 Background and Progress:

The first phase of the Transformation 2025 plan formally launched in 2015 had specific goals, strategies and benchmarks.

Over 4,000 adults and 4,000 youth have provided input on the initial plan which has been updated with recommendations from the community and leaders from every sector on an annual basis.

Collectively, we were able to make measurable progress for African-Americans and North Omaha residents which has had a positive impact on the entire region.  Hundreds of organizations and thousands of residents have participated in the work to create the momentum and these results:

Collective Results 2009-2019 (Before COVID):

  • Reduced unemployment from a high of 20% to 7.5%.  Connected over 2,000 residents to employment.
  • Increased youth employment.  Connected over 6,500 youth to career exploration, jobs and internships.
  • Increased household incomes.  From a low of $34,170 to a high of $39,434.
  • Reduced poverty.  32% to 22%.
  • Increased high school graduation rates.  64% to a high of 80%.
  • Increase the number with college degrees.  16% to a high of 22%.
  • Increase the number of housing units in North Omaha.  Over 1,000 new mixed-income units developed.
  • Reduced gun violence.  Decreased as much as -74% before spiking again in 2020 in the midst of COVID.
  • Started the process of rebuilding the arts, culture, entertainment and business district at 24th and Lake.
  • Increased visits to the North Omaha Village Zone area (16th to 36th, Cumings to Pratt).  Hosted events attracting over 5,000 to the district.
  • Served as catalysts to generate hundreds of millions in public/private redevelopment in North Omaha.

(Data Sources:  American Community Survey, Census; UNO Research; Omaha Public Schools; Nebraska Dept. of Education; Omaha Police Department, City of Omaha – Planning Department and others)

There’s a lot more work ahead.  Together, we can create more positive change.

Help set the priorities for the next five years by updating the Transformation 2025 Plan.

Continue Reading

Community Features

Ted Lampkin: Rising to Meet the Challenge

Sponsored Content:
Charles Drew Health Center

Growing up down the street from Charles Drew Health Center, Inc., it was no question for Ted Lampkin to give back to the community that helped raise him.

“I’m passionate about public health because I am a product of public health services. Coming up, my family and I used the services at Charles Drew.”

As the Associate Director of Behavioral Health Services, Ted has been on the front-line teaching and training team members in new approaches to behavioral health. It’s no surprise that when COVID-19 struck, Ted was front and center.

“My role was to help transition the Behavioral Health department from doing face-to-face therapy to telehealth therapy.”

While COVID-19 began to escalate, increasing evidence highlighted racial and ethnic minority groups are being disproportionately affected by COVID-19.

“We made it easy for the patients, providing traditional face-to-face, telehealth, and when needed telephonic sessions. A lot of patients had anxiety about COVID-19 and being in the middle of a pandemic, in addition to their other stressers.”

“The benefit of telehealth is we can continue to provide quality service during a pandemic. You take out the barriers to care with telehealth.”

Continue Reading

Community Features

Brenda Avant: Providing Quality Healthcare in the Midst of COVID-19

Sponsored Content:
Charles Drew Health Center

As a North Omaha native, Family Nurse Practitioner, Brenda Avant, understands educating her patients about their healthcare choices is a foundational principle to accessing safe and quality healthcare.

When the pandemic shut down Omaha metro schools, Brenda and the team members at Charles Drew Health Center, Inc. School-based Health Centers had to switch gears. While still providing in-person care, the SBHC Medical providers began utilizing telehealth to remain in contact with their patients.

“The telehealth program at Charles Drew really grew at that time. As Medical providers, we were able to continue serving our student patients through telehealth. The parents really enjoyed it because they felt even through a pandemic their child’s provider is still in tune with their needs.”

As the pandemic surged, the healthcare inequalities within the American health system began to come to the foreground. “It made me proud to see that Charles Drew was a front runner in COVID-19. The community was looking to us to help guide them through.”

“Charles Drew made it very easy for the population we serve to continue receiving care. We may be small, but we are mighty.”

 

Continue Reading

Community Features

Larry Duncan: Resiliency in the Face of a Crisis

Sponsored Content:
Charles Drew Health Center

Hailing from the south side of Chicago, Larry Duncan, Director of Behavioral Health Services at Charles Drew Health Center, Inc. has always had a passion for helping others. “My passion, at first, started off with a drug and alcohol emphasis based on my own experiences and knowledge. As I grew and received more education, mental health became the next umbrella. It rests with my understanding that there are unique issues that affect black and brown people, and people who are marginalized.”

Within the first year serving at Charles Drew, Larry faced his biggest challenge yet, leading a team while in the mists of coronavirus. “The number one thing we did quickly was become active.” As COVID-19 began to highlight the care gaps within marginalized communities, the Behavioral Health team at Charles Drew looked to bridge those gaps within the community.

“For our population it was a dual threat. On one side of the coin, the crisis becomes an additional stress to a population of people who already live with stress. On the flip side of the coin, the lack of community and social interaction increased depression, anxiety, and a sense of hopelessness.”

The message was simple, but practical: Practice the Five Cs–Connection, Commitment, Communion, Contain, and Continue.

Looking back, one of the greatest strengths of Charles Drew, in Larry’s eyes, was the ability to remain active. While most were waiting, frozen in their activity, Charles Drew advanced forward.

“We got better and better at it. We were doing testing on the front line when testing was just starting. As masks began to be required, we were handing them out to the community members in need. Whatever needed to be done in the face of this virus, we did it.”

Continue Reading
error: Content is protected !!