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Doris Moore and the Center for Holistic Development are celebrating 20 years of serving the community

When Doris Moore decided to enter the behavioral health field, she wanted to answer one question, “Why do people feel the way they do?” With no mental health background, and a Bachelor’s in Psychology, she returned to school 14 years later and received her Master’s degree in Community Counseling.

Moore is the founder and CEO of Center for Holistic Development (CHD), a non-profit focused on providing mental and behavioral health counseling and prevention programs in North Omaha.

The CHD offers programs that provide a culturally competent approach to address the behavioral health care needs of the Black community. Eighty percent of the clientele the organization serves is African American.

Moore is passionate about the work she gets to do on a daily basis. She refers to the work as “a calling” and she feels it is her mission to help others recognize how important their mental and emotional state is for living a productive life. Moore says, “There is a counseling term called stinky thinking. That is how your life will be; if you think you can’t, then you can’t. If you think of the positive possibilities, than you can.”

She also recognizes there are some individuals that have severe mental illness due to traumas, negative influence, racism, abuse, and micro aggressions. All these things impact our ability to be our authentic self and how we move forward.

“I recognize when people are struggling with depression or anxiety, and I want to know what is behind that. What is the thing that makes you feel life is becoming a challenge and question if living is worth it?,” says Moore.

(Photo:  The late Betty Nelum, first contract therapist at CHD; Pastor Kenneth Allen, Senior Pastor of Zion Baptist Church; and, Doris Moore, CEO and Founder Center for Holistic Development)

She opened the doors to CHD in 2001 with the goal of providing a holistic approach to behavioral health care services to her community. Moore developed a model that focuses on the balance and well-being of individuals. She created the acronym S.P.E.C.I.A.L.™ which focuses on specific areas that she and her team practice within the CHD.

Spiritual – Acknowledging and valuing the presence of a higher power that influences your life’s purpose to create inner peace.

Physical – Adhering to standards that promote appropriate diet, weight, exercise, and rest.

Emotional/Economic – Ability to understand, recognize, and manage personal emotions. Also developing an approach for economic stability resulting in adequate finances to meet one’s obligations.

Cultural – Recognition and appreciation of your cultural and ethnic heritage as a positive influence on self-concept.

Intellectual – Promoting and participating in a personal philosophy of lifelong learning.

Associations (Social) – Developing and maintaining a social support system that encourages and enhances the positive self.

Love for Self and Others – Recognition and appreciation for self. Valuing the gift of interconnectedness to all individuals.

CHD provides intervention, prevention, education and community outreach services. The goal is to help perspective clients understand what mental health is, and what is defined as mental illness. CHD also strives to provide information to dispel the stigma and increase utilization rates through a staff of diverse mental health professionals.

(Photo:  Center for Holistic Development Team)


Services Provided by CHD:

Center for Holistic Development is focused on four key areas which are related to bring mental and behavioral health:

  • These programs are designed to interrupt potential negative influences that challenge mental health.
  • Become an advocate for your own mental health and your self-care. Recognize the connection between mental health and total health care.
  • Community education. CHD offers free behavioral stress screenings on their website, org.
  • Intervention: CHD has professional mental health counselors that provide individual or family counseling, and substance abuse counseling.

CHD Prevention Programs are offered for 0 to 99 years of age. Many of the programs have made adjustments due to COVID restrictions.

KidSquad. The program works with teachers, staff, and parents at childcare centers to help children who have challenging behaviors.

Real Talk. A program within four Omaha Public middle schools that is now offered virtually due to COVID. The program is geared toward building social and emotional competence in middle school age students.

Urban Youth BOLT (Building Our Leaders Today) The program provides early intervention and prevention, and works with youth referred from the families, agencies, and the Juvenile Assessment Center.

Family Engagement and Resource connection. Provides parents with evidence-based techniques to enhance nurturing and parent engagement within all levels of parenting.

GrandFriends for Grassroots change. A mentoring program for young adults ages 19-30 to be matched up with seasoned adults.

CHD has seen an increase in the demand for counseling since the beginning of the pandemic. Due to COVID-19, the center offers socially distance or virtual counseling services for individuals, groups, youth and adults.

Most people haven’t recognized all the feelings that can be triggered from COVID. Emotions can range from anxiety and  guilt,  to  grief and depression.

Moore says, “There is a lot of uncertainty and anxiety about the virus, and the volumes of information regarding the testing, vaccines, etc. There is guilt with the fact of screening positive and unknowingly infecting friends and family. It is important to find a balance and manage the myriad of emotions associated with this challenging time. While some people struggle with mild mental or emotional symptoms, and others are challenged with more severe concerns. When life gets to be too much, contact a behavioral health specialist. Just as with other medical conditions, treatment can be paid for through your insurance.”

“While there is a more heightened level of stress and loss of control and grief, it is important to stop and take care of yourself.”

The Center for Holistic Development offers a free anonymous online mental health screening for individuals on their website, and offers a free meditation video featuring Felicia Webster on their Facebook page: Facebook/CHDOmaha.

For more information about their programs, visit chdomaha.org or call 402-502-9788.

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B.J. Nelum Lighthouse Award

Betty Nelum was the Center for Holistic Development’s first contract therapist. Nelum had a long history in the community of providing behavioral health care and substance abuse services. She also assisted with the fundraising for the organization. Moore considers Nelum instrumental in getting the company to where it is today.

Since her passing in 2014, the CHD honors her legacy by presenting the BJ Nelum Lighthouse award to a recipient at their annual fundraising luncheon. As the Center for Holistic Development, Inc. celebrates 20 years of service to the community, they are deeply indebted to those who have helped them reach this momentous milestone.

Community Features

Revive Center welcomes Chef Jamil to 24th and Lake

The Revive Center is excited to welcome Chef Jamil of House of Bah back to 24th and Lake this weekend. Make a Reservation Now!

Chef Jamil and his now-famous Jerk Chicken were a huge hit during Native Omaha Days.  Since that time, he has won first place a the PitchBlack competition hosted by the Midlands African Chamber and received overwhelming support at the recent Afro Fest held at Aksarben.

“This has been an unbelievable time for me, my family and all of our partners,” said Jamil.

“In some ways, I tried to leave the kitchen, but it keeps calling me back.  It has been passed down through the generations of my family.”

One of Chef Jamil’s goals is to introduce African food and culture in new ways.  Through his non-profit, Eat N’ Talk Africa, he’s doing exactly that.  The goal is in his words is “to shed light on African Culinary Heritage and offer forums for intercultural exchange.”

This summer he partnered for the first time with the Empowerment Network’s Step-Up Omaha program to offer hands on culinary training to a cohort of 14 and 15 year olds.  The youth advanced to preparing and cooking their own meals and worked with the entrepreneurship and technology cohorts to design and implement the Step-Up Cafe.

“The food is just one part of the vision,” he said.  “I want the food to help create conversation, build bridges across different races and nationalities and create knowledge and understanding about Africa.  It’s bigger than the food.”

Though his vision is bigger than the food, the food is downright excellent.  Jamil brings incredibly delicious food with exquisite African flavor.  Customers have given rave reviews.  The presentation is second to none.

“One of the primary goals for the Revive Center is to provide a platform for chefs and cooks to introduce new foods options to the community and specifically 24th and Lake,” said Yolanda Barney, co-owner of the Revive Center.

“Not only is Chef Jamil bringing fresh new dishes with an African flavor, he’s working with us to accomplish another goal of presenting more fine dining opportunities in North Omaha.”

Chef Jamil will present the Casual/Fine Dining Experience during a Pop Up at the Revive Center on Friday and Saturday. Space is limited. Its best to make a reservation or order in advance for these nights.

Reservations can be made here.   Order in Advance or for Take out here.  Chef Jamil will present a three-course meal including Jerk Chicken, Cornmeal Crusted Salmon, Vegan dishes, appetizers and desserts.

On Sunday, Chef Jamil will be the featured Chef at the Revive Center’s popular Sunday Gospel Lunch between noon and 3 pm. Open seating is available as well as curbside and takeout.

In addition to these special events and popups, The Revive Center is open every week Tuesday – Saturday for lunch 11:30-2 pm.  Champions Cafe features fried and grilled chicken sandwiches and strips, original gourmet burgers and specialty salads by Darnell Relford.  Thursday – Saturday during lunch Wes Zollicoffer of Feeding Royals features shrimp and grits, rasta pasta, croquettes, and other pasta and seafood dishes.  Open seating is available as well as take out and curbside.

For more information, please call 402-490-1542.

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Community Features

Ted Lampkin: Rising to Meet the Challenge

Sponsored Content:
Charles Drew Health Center

Growing up down the street from Charles Drew Health Center, Inc., it was no question for Ted Lampkin to give back to the community that helped raise him.

“I’m passionate about public health because I am a product of public health services. Coming up, my family and I used the services at Charles Drew.”

As the Associate Director of Behavioral Health Services, Ted has been on the front-line teaching and training team members in new approaches to behavioral health. It’s no surprise that when COVID-19 struck, Ted was front and center.

“My role was to help transition the Behavioral Health department from doing face-to-face therapy to telehealth therapy.”

While COVID-19 began to escalate, increasing evidence highlighted racial and ethnic minority groups are being disproportionately affected by COVID-19.

“We made it easy for the patients, providing traditional face-to-face, telehealth, and when needed telephonic sessions. A lot of patients had anxiety about COVID-19 and being in the middle of a pandemic, in addition to their other stressers.”

“The benefit of telehealth is we can continue to provide quality service during a pandemic. You take out the barriers to care with telehealth.”

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Community Features

Brenda Avant: Providing Quality Healthcare in the Midst of COVID-19

Sponsored Content:
Charles Drew Health Center

As a North Omaha native, Family Nurse Practitioner, Brenda Avant, understands educating her patients about their healthcare choices is a foundational principle to accessing safe and quality healthcare.

When the pandemic shut down Omaha metro schools, Brenda and the team members at Charles Drew Health Center, Inc. School-based Health Centers had to switch gears. While still providing in-person care, the SBHC Medical providers began utilizing telehealth to remain in contact with their patients.

“The telehealth program at Charles Drew really grew at that time. As Medical providers, we were able to continue serving our student patients through telehealth. The parents really enjoyed it because they felt even through a pandemic their child’s provider is still in tune with their needs.”

As the pandemic surged, the healthcare inequalities within the American health system began to come to the foreground. “It made me proud to see that Charles Drew was a front runner in COVID-19. The community was looking to us to help guide them through.”

“Charles Drew made it very easy for the population we serve to continue receiving care. We may be small, but we are mighty.”

 

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